Port Macquarie Dentist News

By proadAccountId-381214 04 Apr, 2017
Hormonal changes during pregnancy increase the risk of gum disease. Check out how to stay healthy during pregnancy for both you and your baby.

Find out more by clicking the link here:  http://www.ocregister.com/articles/care-711638-teeth-dental.html
By proadAccountId-381214 29 Mar, 2017

Long-term gum infection can eventually result in the loss of your teeth. But the consequences may not end there. Recent research suggests that there may be an association between oral infections — primarily gum infections — and poorly controlled diabetes, cardiovascular disease and preterm birth. More research is needed to determine whether oral infections actually cause these conditions, which include:

  • Poorly controlled diabetes.   If you have diabetes, you're already at increased risk of developing gum disease. But chronic gum disease may, in fact, make diabetes more difficult to control, as well. Infection may cause insulin resistance, which disrupts blood sugar control.

  • Cardiovascular disease.   Oral inflammation due to bacteria (gingivitis) may also play a role in clogged arteries and blood clots. It appears that bacteria in the mouth may cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation may serve as a base for development of atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries, possibly increasing your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Some research suggests that people with gum infections are also at increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The more severe the infection, the greater the risk appears to be. And gum disease and tooth loss may contribute to plaques in the carotid artery. In one study, 46 percent of participants who'd lost up to nine teeth had carotid artery plaque; among those who'd lost 10 or more teeth, 60 percent of them had such plaque.

  • Preterm birth.   Severe gum disease may increase the risk of preterm delivery and giving birth to a low birth weight baby. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, in fact, estimates that as many as 18 percent of preterm, low birth weight babies each year may be attributed to oral infections. The theory is that oral bacteria release toxins, which reach the placenta through the mother's bloodstream and interfere with the growth and development of the fetus. At the same time, the oral infection causes the mother to produce labor-triggering substances too quickly, potentially triggering premature labor and birth.
It is always best to have regular examinations with your dentist to determine your risk. The longer you wait, the further the damage may be. Dont delay and arrange a full checkup today, for the sake of your longevity.  
By proadAccountId-381214 23 Mar, 2017
1. Brush at least twice a day . The best time to brush teeth is after meals. Choose a toothbrush with a small head for better access to back teeth. Soft bristles are kinder on your gums.

2. Use fluoridated toothpaste. Fluoride helps to harden tooth enamel and reduces your risk of decay. If you need to use alternatives (fluoride free), ask our team of professionals for advice.

3. Look in the mirror - dont be aftraid to look closely at your own mouth. If something does not look right, call to get it attended to! The earlier the cavity, the less the pain

4. Floss your teeth daily. Use a slow and gentle sawing motion

5. Limit acidic drinks like soft drinks, cordials and fruit juices. Food acids soften tooth material and dissolve the minerals in tooth enamel, causing holes (cavities or caries). In severe cases, teeth may be right down to the gum

6. Limit sugary foods . Bacteria in dental plaque change sugars into acids

7. Protect your teeth from injury. Wear a mouthguard or full-face helmet when playing sports

8. Try to save a knocked out tooth . If possible, hold the tooth back in place while you seek immediate dental advice. If this is not possible, wrap the tooth in plastic or place it in milk and seek dental advice immediately

9. Avoid using your teeth for anything other than chewing food . If you use them to crack nuts, remove bottle tops or rip open packaging, you risk chipping or even breaking your teeth

10. See Port Smiles for regular check-ups . We believe in prevention, and give you personalised tips to keep your teeth, for life :)
By proadAccountId-381214 04 Apr, 2017
Hormonal changes during pregnancy increase the risk of gum disease. Check out how to stay healthy during pregnancy for both you and your baby.

Find out more by clicking the link here:  http://www.ocregister.com/articles/care-711638-teeth-dental.html
By proadAccountId-381214 29 Mar, 2017

Long-term gum infection can eventually result in the loss of your teeth. But the consequences may not end there. Recent research suggests that there may be an association between oral infections — primarily gum infections — and poorly controlled diabetes, cardiovascular disease and preterm birth. More research is needed to determine whether oral infections actually cause these conditions, which include:

  • Poorly controlled diabetes.   If you have diabetes, you're already at increased risk of developing gum disease. But chronic gum disease may, in fact, make diabetes more difficult to control, as well. Infection may cause insulin resistance, which disrupts blood sugar control.

  • Cardiovascular disease.   Oral inflammation due to bacteria (gingivitis) may also play a role in clogged arteries and blood clots. It appears that bacteria in the mouth may cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation may serve as a base for development of atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries, possibly increasing your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Some research suggests that people with gum infections are also at increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The more severe the infection, the greater the risk appears to be. And gum disease and tooth loss may contribute to plaques in the carotid artery. In one study, 46 percent of participants who'd lost up to nine teeth had carotid artery plaque; among those who'd lost 10 or more teeth, 60 percent of them had such plaque.

  • Preterm birth.   Severe gum disease may increase the risk of preterm delivery and giving birth to a low birth weight baby. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, in fact, estimates that as many as 18 percent of preterm, low birth weight babies each year may be attributed to oral infections. The theory is that oral bacteria release toxins, which reach the placenta through the mother's bloodstream and interfere with the growth and development of the fetus. At the same time, the oral infection causes the mother to produce labor-triggering substances too quickly, potentially triggering premature labor and birth.
It is always best to have regular examinations with your dentist to determine your risk. The longer you wait, the further the damage may be. Dont delay and arrange a full checkup today, for the sake of your longevity.  
By proadAccountId-381214 23 Mar, 2017
1. Brush at least twice a day . The best time to brush teeth is after meals. Choose a toothbrush with a small head for better access to back teeth. Soft bristles are kinder on your gums.

2. Use fluoridated toothpaste. Fluoride helps to harden tooth enamel and reduces your risk of decay. If you need to use alternatives (fluoride free), ask our team of professionals for advice.

3. Look in the mirror - dont be aftraid to look closely at your own mouth. If something does not look right, call to get it attended to! The earlier the cavity, the less the pain

4. Floss your teeth daily. Use a slow and gentle sawing motion

5. Limit acidic drinks like soft drinks, cordials and fruit juices. Food acids soften tooth material and dissolve the minerals in tooth enamel, causing holes (cavities or caries). In severe cases, teeth may be right down to the gum

6. Limit sugary foods . Bacteria in dental plaque change sugars into acids

7. Protect your teeth from injury. Wear a mouthguard or full-face helmet when playing sports

8. Try to save a knocked out tooth . If possible, hold the tooth back in place while you seek immediate dental advice. If this is not possible, wrap the tooth in plastic or place it in milk and seek dental advice immediately

9. Avoid using your teeth for anything other than chewing food . If you use them to crack nuts, remove bottle tops or rip open packaging, you risk chipping or even breaking your teeth

10. See Port Smiles for regular check-ups . We believe in prevention, and give you personalised tips to keep your teeth, for life :)
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